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What is an Artistic Vacuum and why every Artist needs one !

Artistic Vacuum

What is an Artistic Vacuum?

An “artistic vacuum” is when you look within yourself to inspire your art. All your potential is inside you already and it just needs to be released. You shouldn’t release it though inspiration via social media, internet searches or the last gallery you were at. Be inspired by the things you actually want to paint. Paint the things you are scared of because it’s too personal or paint your personal style. Using this method you’re fulfilling your path and not riding through others. Inspiration has already been built up before you went to the gallery, they just gave you a kick in the arse to get back to it !

What inspired the “artistic vacuum” philosophy?

In the Age of distraction from all this online social media I still need to do my journey of finding out who I am, as an artist. A help in this mindset was when I saw an interview of James Cameron and he said that whenever he is about to make a film he doesn’t watch anyone else’s as it may effect or influence his movie. That wisdom has allowed me to ignore what other artists are doing to make my own styles & techniques. I think you have completely missed the point if you think art is doing a better version of someone else’s artwork. That’s a competitive outlook and nothing good comes from it. You should be doing your best, not trying to be better than other artists. You need to outdo yourself not your people, that comes from a kinder place.

What about feedback from the outside world or people you appreciate?

Feedback is still great, but after you have explored a series by yourself. Go down the rabbit hole, come back up, then ask for directions. It’s your journey, your artwork.

Being in the vacuum means you are doing something and not busy talking to everyone. You can turn off your mobile device for a few hours and just put paint to canvas or pencil to paper. You have no one to give your excuses about why you haven’t done any art when you’re alone in the studio.

What role does selling art or commissions play in an artistic vacuum practice?

This is when the vacuum pays off. Commissioned art is possible as I have done many in Australia and overseas. I show clients different artworks with a number of techniques and take onboard colour changes to match their taste and décor. It remains my technique and my design. It’s the best time to consider new colours to my palette as I’m pleasing the client first. Listening to the client is the most important person you will ever listen to, forget online comments, you never know if that person had a bad day and wanted to dump their rubbish on a poor little artist…or hopefully they dump some money on you 🙂 

– Mendo Vasilevski

 

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